Monday, 18 September 2017

How To... Fringe Benefits

One of the best things about crafting something yourself is the fact that you can embellish or adjust it to suit your own likes and dislikes.  If you want to you can change the colour, make something bigger or smaller or add things that you want to include - or leave out those you don't!

It is all about personalising and making it your very own.  You could say that is the fringe benefit of making it yourself!

Something that I like to do when making scarves is to add a fringe along the bottom.  It is good for several reasons - fringes are lovely being one! - you can use up any yarn you have left over and if you have made a shawl or scarf and it is a little shorter than you wanted adding a fringe just makes it feel that little bit longer - or a lot longer if you go for a really long fringe of course!


Adding a fringe is really easy to do once you know how, but the trick to getting a really professional finish is to make sure that it is really even and neat along the edge.  This is also easy when you know how, but it is knowing how that might be the tricky bit.

So today I am going to take you through the really easy process of adding a fringe to a scarf - the but the process is the same for any crocheted or knitted item that you want to put a fringe on.  Just imagine your favourite shawl with a swishy fringe along the bottom, or a wonderful blanket with an edging to twiddle in your fingers while you are snuggled up watching your favourite tv show.

To start you need to work out how long you want your fringe to be and how many strands of it you will need.  If you are doing a really big project like a blanket you are probably just best to buy an extra ball or two of yarn and just get going because you will use a lot of yarn.  For something smaller, like the scarf I am using to illustrate here you can count the number of stitches you will work into and get a better idea of how much yarn you need.

All of that sounds worse than it is though.  Just decide how long you want your fringe to be and then get cutting.  So if you want a three inch fringe, cut your lengths of yarn to be about 7 inches long - because you will double the strand and need a bit to tie it on with - and cut enough strands for each stitch you are going to work into. 

For this project, I did a three inch fringe, working 2 strands of yarn into 30 stitches so I needed to cut 60 lengths.  I suggest you find a suitable sized book, wrap your yarn around it to make a big loop and then ease the yarn off and cut it into strands at the top and bottom of the loop you have formed.

OK, that long explanation really is the worst of it!  Now to the easy bit.

Insert a crochet hook - even if you are working on a knitted item - into the stitch you want to add the fringe to.


Loop the yarn around the hook - I am using 2 strands, but you could add more.


Pull the yarn strands through the stitch with your hook.


Remove the hook.

Pull the ends of the strands through the loop.


Gently pull tight and voila, you have started your fringe.  Work you way along the edge until you have finished.


Easy isn't it.


The next stage is the most important, and is just as easy, when you know how.

You will need a ruler, a cutting mat and a rotary cutter. 

Lay the edge of the fringe along one of the lines on your cutting mat, making sure that it is straight.  Don't worry about the cut edges of the strands they are what we are about to neaten up.  You just need the line of the fringe/bottom of the article you are working on to be parallel to the line on your cutting mat and for all of the strands to be laid out straight.

Place the ruler over the fringe and make sure that it is at the length you want and parallel to the item you have added the fringe to.


Press down firmly on the ruler with your hand - well out of the way of the edge - and then run your rotary cutter along the edge of the ruler.


Your fringe will then all be cut to the same length all along in one easy swoop of your rotary cutter.  Remove the excess you have cut off and repeat at the other end!  If you are working on a longer project - a blanket or shawl - cut the fringe in sections carefully making sure that each part lines up with the part already cut.  Take your time and keep things straight and steady and using the cutter and the mat you will soon have a beautifully straight edge.




Enjoy adding fringes to things and personalising your makes!

Amy

33 comments:

  1. That is such a neat fringe. I hadn't even thought of using a rotary cutter - Genius! Jo x

    ReplyDelete
  2. What a clever idea - who doesn't love a fringe? I wondered how you got the edge so straight. It makes such a difference. X

    ReplyDelete
  3. I love the fringe and cannot wait to see the finish project. The color is so pretty.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Amy, this is brilliant - thank you! I didn't think I was keen on fringes but I now realise that that's because I have never seen a really nice one. You have converted me because this is lovely. x

    ReplyDelete
  5. Smart to use the cutting mat to trim the fringe! Thanks, Amy!

    ReplyDelete
  6. I would never have thought of using a mat and rotary cutter... and it seems so obvious now you have said it!

    ReplyDelete
  7. How clever is that. Thanks very much.
    J x

    ReplyDelete
  8. Been years since I put a fringe on anything, so this was a good reminder because I'm getting ready to make a scarf and I do want a fringe on it.

    ReplyDelete
  9. My first thought when I saw your fringe is, it is so perfect. And, now I know the secret. ROTARY CUTTER!

    ReplyDelete
  10. What great tips! Thanks so much Amy. My last fringe didn't look so neat. Now I know how to fix it lol. Thanks for the photos too. It's easier for me to 'get' things if I can see them in motion.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Beautiful color! I love fringe :)

    Colletta

    ReplyDelete
  12. I like fringes on certain things although I've never added them to any of my projects. IT's a good tutorial for future reference if ever I decide.
    xx Beca

    ReplyDelete
  13. I love adding a fringe to my scarf or shawl, and basically do the same as you did Amy.

    ReplyDelete
  14. Well explained Amy. I did exactly the same on my granddaughter's scarf a couple of weeks ago & am always pleased with they way they look. Take care.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Fringe is a nice finishing touch, and yours looks good! The rotary cutter is a good idea!

    ReplyDelete
  16. It's so pretty and a great tutorial! Thank you, Amy!

    ReplyDelete
  17. This is a wonderful tutorial. I have avoided fringe because I had no idea of how to do it. Now, I just hope I remember where to find this tutorial when the time comes!

    ReplyDelete
  18. This is a wonderful tutorial. I have avoided fringe because I had no idea of how to do it. Now, I just hope I remember where to find this tutorial when the time comes!

    ReplyDelete
  19. What a good tip for getting that fringe nice and even!

    ReplyDelete
  20. Great tutorial Amy. A beautiful colour for your scarf.

    ReplyDelete

  21. I love your artwork and follow you pots this very minute!
    หนังผี

    ReplyDelete
  22. Great tutorial Amy :) love that pink!

    ReplyDelete
  23. Gorgeous project and wonderful fringe Amy.

    ReplyDelete
  24. What a great tutorial Amy. The fringes make it very pretty, the colour is gorgeous.

    ReplyDelete
  25. Now I want fringe on everything! Thank you for the great tutorial, Amy! xx K

    ReplyDelete
  26. This looks so easy and so pretty.

    ReplyDelete
  27. Never knew it could be so easy! At least you make it look easy.

    ReplyDelete
  28. I don't think I've ever added a fringe, yours really does look so neat and professional. Thank you for the easy to understand pictures xx

    ReplyDelete
  29. It's the neatness that makes it look ultra professional! Great job!
    Jillxo

    ReplyDelete
  30. I love fringe and the #putafringeonit hashtag!
    I've been using the same trimming method for a long time:
    http://lupeyloops.blogspot.com.au/2015/01/seeing-double.html
    http://lupeyloops.blogspot.com.au/2016/10/get-on-your-broomsticks.html
    It really is worth the extra effort, isn't it?

    ReplyDelete

Thank you so very much for stopping by to visit and for leaving a comment, I love hearing what you have to say and I read all of your messages.

All comments are moderated, so it might take a little while for your comment to appear, but it will once I have read it!

Thank you again for visiting!

Amy xx