Wednesday, 18 November 2015

Wordless Wednesday - Eyam Village

Some of the very moving signs from the plague village of Eyam.  You can read more about it here and here.




One of the beautiful doorways in the village


If you click here you can see my previous post about Eyam.

Amy

p.s. don't forget to check who you are swapping Christmas cards with and get in touch with your partner.  The details of the swappers can be found here.

33 comments:

  1. I meant to comment on your previous post at the time. Eyam is indeed a moving place. Yet the village has also got its act together to highlight many other aspects of its history, not just the plague, as your photos show.

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  2. Good idea Amy to have taken the signs and made them into a collage - The Rev. Mompesson was a heroic and farsighted man in the way he prevented the plague travelling further throughout the country.

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  3. Those signs are heart rendering, such an amazing place to visit.

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  4. I'd be interested to hear where you stayed when you holidayed up north. Did you travel around and stay in different places or did you opt for a central base to do day trips from. I'm trying to arrange a visit and am trying to decide where to stay.

    Eyam is one of the places I want to visit, so thanks for sharing your photos and giving me a taster!

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  5. Such a tragedy. The pink flowers look great next to that blue door, don't they. x

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  6. Fascinating! I want to know how Andrew Merrill - the one who built a stone hut on the edge of Eyam Moor - knew when the plague was over. I can't imagine he'd go into the village to find out - or that he'd welcome someone coming to tell him. Off to read the other links to see if they tell me.

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  7. It sounds like a fascinating place to visit. Great front door and plant holders too - are they chimney pots? Have a lovely week. xx

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  8. Very moving. You have reminded me of my visit there. CJ xx

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  9. Eyam sounds a fascinating place to visit. I'm sure there was something about it on TV a while back. I'm off to read some more. X

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  10. It's such an interesting place to visit. I still remember a school trip there so it was fascinating to return again this year.

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  11. Interesting reads . Love the signs . Thanks for sharing lovely photos . Have a good day !

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  12. So sad and haunting. I'm always interested in anything historical and I'm going to teach Kathleen more about this as she is next to me currently working on her history assignment for the day. You go to so may interesting places, I love seeing all your photos. Thank you again for sharing!

    Blessings,
    Jill

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  13. What good records they kept...sorrow upon sorrow...hard to comprehend how much one person can endure as in the case of Jane. I don't believe that we do as good a job with sharing history in my corner. There are no plaques to commemorate the fact that Wild West stars once visited this little New England village for a very specific reason and it was not to put on a show. =D

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  14. Eyam sounds like an interesting place to visit, thanks for sharing your visit. I recently put a plague case study together for a diploma course in tropical medicine and hygiene, it is a fascinating (and still existing) disease. Less frightening now I guess with the availability of treatment. It is good to remember how awfully annihilating infectious diseases can be.

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  15. The signs and the door seem to be colour co-ordinated.

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  16. How horrible to lose your whole family that way.

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  17. Amy, I'm in touch with my swapping partner (that doesn't sound quite right), so need to get a special card. The doorway is intriguing.

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  18. Although interesting, what a sad village this must have been. It must have been difficult to pull yourself through such an ordeal.
    Wendy

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  19. Wow! So moving Amy - thanks for sharing. xoxo

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  20. Very moving plaques and so sad. Lovely doorway. Take care.

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  21. I enjoyed your posts about Eyam, it was however so sad to read about it's sad story. Sarah x

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  22. We have our troubles in the modern day world but thankfully
    the plaque isn't one of them!
    We had a couple of trips to England and I love all the beautiful
    villages and walking the footpaths etc. Hope I can go back some
    day soon.
    Thank you for your visit.
    Carolyn

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  23. What an amazing and moving place to visit. A fascinating post, thank you for sharing.
    Cathy x

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  24. Thank you for sharing. Very interesting and isn't this door exquisite?

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  25. I love the color of that pretty door!

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  26. This was very interesting. Thankful for modern medicine and medical knowledge.

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  27. Hi Amy. Oh, these signs bring tears to my eyes, but bless the Reverend. There are so many interesting places around you. Thanks for popping in to see me and hope your week is going well.
    Be a sweetie,
    Shelia ;)

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  28. So touching - I bet it was very moving to visit. I really like that door!

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  29. That door looks good and sturdy.. I wonder how thick it is? We have an old oak door on our farmhouse that has been around for a long time. ((hugs)), Teresa :-)

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  30. Such sad stories of these brave people. Eyam is a lovely village to visit isn't it?:)

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  31. oh no I wasn't expecting that, so sad xx

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