Wednesday, 15 October 2014

Trickery in Films

Thank you so much for your kind words on my last couple of posts.  They are so appreciated as are your good thoughts and wishes.  You know already I hope, but just in case you don't, you really are the nicest group of people!

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I have various posts about Basildon Park sitting in drafts from time to time waiting to be posted, so I thought that today I would share this one with you.

When we have filming work done at Basildon Park sometimes they bring in their own furniture, sometimes they use ours. 

When they filmed for Pride and Prejudice they actually built a whole room inside another room.  They also used the Dining Room as the ballroom at Netherfield Park, but decided that it needed more columns.  So they added some of their own!  As you do.

This is the inside of one of the fake columns.


Here you can see three sections.


And the base of a column.



This is what the real columns look like.  You can see that the "fakes" are a very good match.


The columns in the picture are the ones that are always in the Dining Room.


There is in a way a bit of a joke to all this though.  The columns in the Dining Room aren't real.  In the 18th Century when the house was built it was more fashionable to have an artist come and paint fake columns than to have real marble.

The reason?  It meant that you were rich enough to afford to pay the artist!

Amy

38 comments:

  1. Wow, perhaps I should add some fake columns to my house :)

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  2. Hi Amy, I just did a catch up read on your posts, how did I miss them? All your garden pictures look great, love the colors, I have never seen flowers on a yucca plant they look nice. Do they have a smell? Interesting about the marble columns, they do look just the same. Do you work in Basildon Park?

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  3. How fascinating. To look at you would never guess any of them weren't the real thing. And what a lovely job, making scenery and sets. I bet it was great watching the crew at work. CJ xx

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  4. Brilliant - I never knew that about the columns! :) I wonder how many houses I've been to and not realised that? x

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  5. That really made me smile Amy, lovely post.

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  6. Faking a fake...love it. I remember when I did my final drama production at Manchester Poly making fake columns. Ours were made of cardboard and we spray painted them to get that ridged look. I was high for days on spray paint. Happy days ;)

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  7. You have so many stories to tell about Basildon Park, visitors must really enjoy the tours.

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  8. I love the columns. I used to be a prop maker and scene painter so I appreciate the work that must have gone into them! xx

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  9. There's a regal home in Hamilton that has an entire hallway wall made of fake marble. They painted the marble "veins" with feathers. That's a beautiful dining room ... the columns certainly add a grand statement. Wendy x

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  10. Aren't those columns fantastic? Every home should have a pair ;-) x

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  11. Interesting, all that show of wealth. Thank you for the fascinating photos, Amy!

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  12. Hehe that's ironic! it's always so interesting how they deceive people with film sets, very clever :) xx

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  13. It must be fascinating to see what goes on behind the scenes when they film a big production like that! I liek the twist re: the columns - nothing new about paint finishes!
    Look forward to more of these posts, thanks for sharing this Amy!
    Gill xx

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  14. Amy, the frescos on the ceilings are always interesting to me. I wonder how the artist does some of those, perched on a scaffold or something. But I guess folks like starving artists will do just about any painting to get buy.

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  15. It must be so much fun to be there when there is filming going on !!

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  16. An interesting look behind the scenes :) those columns look so real!

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  17. Which Pride and Prejudice was filmed there, the Colin Firth one or the Keira Knightley? What a beautiful place, fake columns and all.

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  18. How funny! I had no idea that painted columns were more upmarket than the real thing. I have some catching up to do, I am way behind blog reading. Cx

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  19. That is so interesting - and funny too!

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  20. That's so funny, thanks for sharing Amy. xx

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  21. Fascinating, Amy! I enjoyed reading this and seeing your pictures, and learning something I didn't know!
    Helen xox

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  22. How interesting!
    Pride and Prejudice is my daughter's favorite movie (the Keira Knightley one).

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  23. A very interesting and informative post about all the dramatic, behind the scenes intrigue!! I can see the appeal of painted columns as opposed to marble ones, but I have to admit, I'd definitely choose the latter.

    Happy Wednesday,

    xx
    Poppy

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  24. I enjoyed hearing about this trickery in movies. When a movie was filmed at Kings Landing Historical Settlement, they painted one of the farm houses dark red, in keeping with the New England tradition. They even 'burned' the house down which was an amazing form of trickery that looked very real.

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  25. What an interesting post! I'm glad to get a peek behind the scenes!

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  26. I've heard of this and now I can't remember where. Anyway, I'd seen fake marble in a green color and it was impressively realistic!

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  27. What a pretty room! Love the fake marble columns - they do look real! How exciting to have a film crew there, too.

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  28. Hi Amy! How interesting, I would have never guessed!
    Ingrid xx
    http://myfunkycrochet.blogspot.be

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  29. I wish I could pay someone to come and paint my future house!

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  30. It must be very exciting when filming is going on- have you met any famous actors? Love the fake columns. Very clever x

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  31. Ah I've seen painted columns before and had always assumed the opposite, that they were put in by people who couldn't afford marble columns. Thanks for the insight.

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  32. Brilliant!! What a great perspective of the 'big house'!! Thank you for this lovely insight, J9 x

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  33. Fascinating insight, thanks for sharing xcx

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  34. Fascinating about the marble columns. I'm reading about Netherfield at the moment in "Longbourn" by Jo Baker

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  35. Wow -- how interesting about the columns! I have a friend here who has recently restored a home from the late 1800's. It's been very expensive because they hired painters to paint all the trim to look like wood, rather than just stain the wood -- she said that's the way they would've done it back then and they wanted it to be authentic. Your photos of the grand rooms are really pretty!

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  36. That is fascinating, it looks like real marble from here!
    Hugs,
    Meredith

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